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posted ago by happybillmoney ago by happybillmoney +68 / -2

Hello fellow consumers,

As always thank you to everyone that participated in the last weekly and remember you are Operation MONKE!

u/AlmostBased, u/TheClintonHitman, u/Joesf23, u/Blursed2021, u/sunshinenationalist, u/TheWestYearZero, u/DJT_JR6544, u/Captain_Raamsley, u/TendieMan, u/ChadRight92, u/Cockandballtorture10, u/Lopied1, u/GeneralStorm, u/ModsBanPaleos, u/FloorGypsy, u/WhiteyMcWhite, u/YurtsForTrump, u/BasedTemplar, u/laughingdingo, u/Remantro, u/Berglewits, u/1776pill, u/YEETveteran8888, u/MOORWHITEBABBEES, u/Half_alive, u/atomical, u/Removmudrace, u/BigBeef, u/cutefroggy, u/penis_butler77, u/codreanuAppreciator, u/FuqSpez, u/wehrmacht, u/lemonjuice, u/crash7863, u/pertivi, u/subbookkeeper, u/TechParadox, u/drjillsusedscrunchie

NOTE: Very interesting weekly. Good job everyone.


This Weeks Discussion Theme: Consume History

As the saying goes “you can't know where you are going unless you know where you came from”. This weekly is on history. In this weekly we will consume history by sharing our favorite historical periods and discussing them. Feel free to bring up specific events, decades, or centuries that are interesting to study. Or even focus your discussion on different types of history like social, cultural, political etc.. Expectedly many of you will be well studied on the history between 1939 and 1945. So as a challenge to you try to cover an area of history that you think others might not be familiar with.

Discussion ideas:

  • What’s your favorite area of history to study? E.g., Contemporary, Modern Era, Early Modern, Middle Ages, Classical, etc..
  • Share a world impacting event that others might not be familiar with.
  • What are your favorite ways to study history? E.g., Wikipedia / searching online, class, documentaries, books.

NOTE: Just want to make something clear. If WWII is your favorite historical topic do feel free to bring it up. Just please put some effort in the aspect you are covering. Think about something you’ve studied that you would like to share that others might not be aware of to encourage the them to also study it. Try to do this for any historical topic you wish to cover.

Let’s get some great discussions going!


Weekly Polls:


Previous Weeklies:

Comments (85)
sorted by:
21
KasierVonGoguryeo191 21 points ago +21 / -0

When I study history, one of my favorite aspects now are the flags that the nations used, medieval European ones specifically. Those designs are just incredible, and really show the brilliance of the craftsmen of the times, whether it was for a country the size of a town, a principality, a duchy, or a kingdom, they all had their own, unique flair. So I'd say Medieval Europe for me, but I do like 1920s-1940s America as well, 20s-30s aesthetic is one of my favorites

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happybillmoney [S] 8 points ago +8 / -0

The John Paul Jones Flag Is neat looking.

Cool story behind it.

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ChicagoMAGA 5 points ago +5 / -0

Flags can be pretty cool, even if what they represent sucks.

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FreudianLisp 2 points ago +2 / -0

Do you have examples for some of your favourites?

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KasierVonGoguryeo191 2 points ago +2 / -0

HRE flags are great, I also like medieval French and English flags, but Italian ones are great too

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GeorgeFentanylFloyd 20 points ago +20 / -0

Studying the decline of Rome because it feels similar to today’s society

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TheClintonHitman 7 points ago +7 / -0

😞 yea

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deleted 7 points ago +8 / -1
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TheWestYearZero 19 points ago +19 / -0

I tend to read to fill in gaps. For example, i knew little about the history of italy, especially the 19th c, and started to follow that up.

Oddly enough, that led me to an interest in the Norman period (11th C) when the Normans entered southern Italy and Sicily. Fascinating stuff.

That took me into an interest in the Bourbons and the Sicilian Vespers, (and the mafia) and that ultimately explained lots about where I started my interest, Italy post-Napoleon and the Resorgimento.

Relevant books:

The Norman Conquest of Southern Italy and Sicily

https://en.id1lib.org/book/5236085/462133

The War of the Sicilian Vespers: The History and Legacy of Siciky's Rebellion against the French in the Late 13th Century

https://en.id1lib.org/book/11745232/747a88

Naples and Napoleon: Southern Italy and the European Revolutions 1780-1860

https://en.id1lib.org/book/809981/215792

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sunshinenationalist 10 points ago +10 / -0

Yeah, when I first heard about the Norman conquest of Sicily, it got me bewildered. Afterwards, wrapping your head around the fact that the Germanic barbarians during the time of Rome aka the Vandals had controlled North Africa, now that is weird. I wonder how North Africa would be if it was ran by Vandal descendants.

I don't know too much about Napoleon but what I do know is that the Jacobins were definitely pseudo-communists that only wished for death. Glad that Napoleon came and swept away with their mess.

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ChicagoMAGA 5 points ago +5 / -0

I like to think I have Norman ancestry. Much of my family is Sicilian, yet many of us are fair-skinned.

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TheWestYearZero 7 points ago +7 / -0

They were the baddest badasses in all of history.

They were all second sons raised to no skill but making war. If they stayed in Normandy, there was nothing for them. So off to Italy they went.

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ChicagoMAGA 3 points ago +3 / -0

Neat. Explains the fierceness of the family!

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FuqSpez 14 points ago +14 / -0

I like studying Classical age European and Middle-Eastern history. I used to be into fantasy lore (lol) and then realized that a lot of the same kind of thing can be found in real ancient history.

If you look at a Medieval or colonial map, things basically resemble the modern world. The religions, languages, and people are recognizable. Borders change, but white and historically Christian societies are in the same place, Slavs and Germanic people are in the same places, Muslim societies are basically in the same place. If you look at a map of 272 BC, you'll find that it's filled with strange nations that speak extinct languages and have weird mythical religions. The world is different enough to evoke that fantasy feeling, only it's real. Like, Turkey since 1500 has occupied all of Anatolia and has been populated by brown Muslim turkroaches. Classical Anatolia had several impressive Greek city states, a region run by blonde haired Gauls (Galacia in the Bible), world wonders, non-Greek black sea empires, frontier battlegrounds between Alexander's successors, etc.

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YEETveteran8888 13 points ago +13 / -0

I know a surprising amount of trivia about the city and neighborhood where I am from. Local history is really cool and I encourage people to also learn that. Even if you’re from some gay suburb.

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TheWestYearZero 3 points ago +3 / -0

This is true.

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Joesf23 2 points ago +2 / -0

Im in the outskirts of a once great midwestern city turned violent shithole. The history of the city and surrounding areas is always neat.

PS. How did your date go last week?

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YEETveteran8888 4 points ago +4 / -0

I’m getting the fuck out of Minneapolis personally. Do we happen to be talking about the same place? Haha

Date went fine. It was a long day before I could meet up with her in the evening so I frankly just wanted to have a pleasant evening. We mostly just talked about camping and travel stories. Towards the end of the night I she was a bit more curious about my perspective on life and it was pretty fun to get to go into. I genuinely don’t think she’d encountered anyone with a mindset like us before.

Anyway, she had a very pretty face but definitely the mid-20’s Starbucks gut that so many girls do. She also told me that her parents separated when she was a kid and so she grew up in a house with her mom and three sisters. About everything else fell into place about her when I heard that.

Also just confirmed that she did not want to carry children but wanted to foster kids and that was it.

Fun evening, but nah, sis. I’ll pass.

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Joesf23 3 points ago +3 / -0

Haha, yeah that is non-keeper. Im down river near the gateway city to west where we also like to have riots over stupid shit.

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YEETveteran8888 4 points ago +4 / -0

It’s a lotta girls these days man. If they want kids it’s adoption or fostering. Just another drop in my bucket of noticing things

Lol I have a friend who just bought a house there and she was like “come move here! It’s so cheap!” And I’m like yeahhhh for a reason 😆

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Joesf23 2 points ago +2 / -0

ZHahahaha! If she bought in north county or anywhere in the city she probably got a house for under 100k...but will probably live next to nogs or hoosiers that will steal her shit...I'm assuming the chicks that all want to adopt or foster want to adopt african or asian babies as the ultimate virtue signal. I knew in lib chick in college (2006ish) who had other shitlib friends that supposedly were going to do the same. Now, they all either married and had own kids, or sit at home by themselves with cats drinking wine and posting pics of nieces and nephews. (Ie the token wine aunt)

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YEETveteran8888 1 point ago +1 / -0

That fucking wine aunt shit is so grim. At least some of them made it.

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Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

What's sad is that the description of where you live near can be any of 12 different cities.

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Joesf23 1 point ago +1 / -0

Basically every major city established before 1950.

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yudsfpbc 11 points ago +12 / -1

I've been fascinated with medieval peasantry. Any material I can get that accurately conveys what it was like to be a peasant, how it worked, etc...

This is a decent, recent video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTm_zb9k2us

I think we are heading back to that sort of situation. Some of us are going to find contentment in living as a peasant. Some of us are going to find happiness in being a tradesman in a town. And some of us will end up being medieval lords. It's not how the marxists portray it. I genuinely believe that for the most part, nobility was trying to do the best they could for their society, guided by the morality taught in the Bible.

In terms of studying history, I find reading books tedious and confusing, though necessary. At best, you are going to get "what" happened, but the "why" is always going to be through the personal interpretation of the author.

In the end, a lot of time should be spent thinking about what you know about human nature, what happened, and figuring out why people chose to live that way. I think there is a resonant, harmonious state in the lord-peasant relationship that can protect everyone involved.

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MisterMeister 3 points ago +3 / -0

I love that channel.

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Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

I admire your entirely misplaced optimism.

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SyntheticSigrunn 9 points ago +9 / -0

Honestly no single era interests me. Because I do not find a set of dates as fascinating as the people who define them.

Napoleon

Julius

Aurelian

Alexander

Genghis

Attila

Charlemagne

Nobunaga

And many others I am surely forgetting.

These men were revered, rightly in their time, some as Gods. They defined history, carried some divine spark that did not grant them greatness, but the ability to, through great struggle and strength, become the era-defining greats that they are. They were not voted in, and few inherited their positions, but nevertheless they achieved them, and changed the world. How many of these have not just I, but all of history forgotten? But more importantly, how many are alive today, the fate and destiny ready to be taken into the hands of one man, unrelenting in his heart-bound fire, to change the world?

How often did Napoleon doubt himself? Or Aurelian? How many times did they want to give up, and live easy? But they never did. It is simply fascinating to me, how amazing man can be. I will always look up to these men. Always. But even more fascinating...

Is how many more there are to be.

I wonder if he is alive today, ready to seize his destiny...

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TendieMan 6 points ago +6 / -0

Based and Great-man-pilled.

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thaicooking 8 points ago +10 / -2

I enjoy studying Cathars, Hussites etc. and their efforts to overthrow the Jew-controlled Catholic Church.

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TheClintonHitman 8 points ago +9 / -1

I feel the Internet has broken the cycle. China or the Jews. That is our future.

Because of this my last few years of interest in history has been studying rebellion, insurrection, terrorism. It’s pretty based shit

Did you know you can produce Chloramine gas (a respiratory irritant similar to Sarin) with bleach and stale piss? Bleach and ammonia with the water portions reduced makes serious grade

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TheClintonHitman 12 points ago +12 / -0

Favorite insurrections or Small unit tactics to research- Celous Scouts get an honorable mention, -IRA -Aum Kults -Chechens -Scottish -Texas independence

  • Uncle Ted (I say he counts)
  • French Foreign Leigon
  • Comanche/Texas Ranger rivalry
  • Apache
  • the Zodiac Killer
  • Seminole Wars
  • Pugachev
  • park Chung hee
  • Alas Uttar
  • Vlad Tipesh There’s more but that’s a good 101-401 curriculum
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thenameisdonald 2 points ago +2 / -0

I looked up Vlad Tipesh and nothing turned up…

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TheClintonHitman 1 point ago +1 / -0

Vlad the impaler? He’s huge and based

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TheClintonHitman 1 point ago +1 / -0

Oh it’s translated to Tepes

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thenameisdonald 1 point ago +1 / -0

Ahh yeah I figured. Vlad the chad. Dude what’s funny is that Romania and Chad are the only two identical national flags in the world.

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AlmostBased 7 points ago +7 / -0

I almost gassed myself by peeing into some bleach I left in the toilet

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TheClintonHitman 5 points ago +5 / -0

I used to clean bathrooms as we closed the bar at night. One night the floor was covered in stale piss and I slopped bleach all over. I nearly threw up in half a second

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deleted 5 points ago +5 / -0
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TheClintonHitman 4 points ago +4 / -0

I don’t know that shit, nearly gave myself an aneurism last time I made it

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deleted 4 points ago +4 / -0
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TheClintonHitman 4 points ago +4 / -0

Hey it’s not like I have to be discreet. I got Clinton money I’m spoiled 😎

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deleted 1 point ago +2 / -1
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hog_hunter 6 points ago +6 / -0

I've always been interested in the daily lives of people of all periods. What did they eat, wear, and do on a daily basis? I think that by looking at the small parts of history you can see the building blocks which make up the big, exciting parts.

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MeinNameistJeff 2 points ago +2 / -0

Yeah that was a fun way to do history. I remember in school we would get assignment where we would write a diary entry of a Roman plebian or medieval villager etc. and we would write about just that what you described.

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sunshinenationalist 5 points ago +5 / -0

As for me, my favorite area of history would have to be the renaissance or the dark ages. My favorite event in history being the rule of the Visigothic Germanic kings upon the Iberians and the start of the Reconquista in the battle of Covadonga. I respect the Spanish monarchy because I do earnestly believe most of the Spanish monarchs acted out in true pure Christian rhetoric unlike some of the monarchs of the time.

My favorite ways to study history is through first reading on wikipedia and then start jumping rabbit holes, eventually ending up in research papers and reading books about the various events. For example, there was a book I found about the Jews in Iberia during the Visigothic to Andalusian days. It was extremely interesting.

One event I'm sure, the lot of you aren't familiar with, is the context surrounding the far-right in Chile before Pinochet's rule. For example, the nacistas held some considerable political weight under Jorge von Marees and Miguel Serrano. There was three major fascistic/national socialist protests that almost ended in the country being turned national socialist but the United States kept a keen eye on the country which prevented it from turning. Instead, the country became communist through propaganda and subversion.

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TheWestYearZero 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yes. the Spanish monsarchy were serious about their Chritisanity and for example in their instructions fro South America wanted to rule for the Christian best of the Indians.

Just didn't work out that way.

5
ChicagoMAGA 5 points ago +5 / -0

The Olmecs interest me. What happened to them? What's the deal with Chichen Itza? Why make the giant heads.

I've been reading Mein Kampf lately and I love a point Hitler made at the beginning of the book about how to view history. He talked about viewing history as one mighty edifice where you can you how one brick relates to another, compared to how some people might view history as isolated events. It's funny that when I read Mein Kampf, I'm able to make connections to that book with works from Machiavelli, Thomas Sowell, and even an Israeli philosopher who wrote Sapiens and Homo Deus. Absolutely brilliant.

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Blursed2021 5 points ago +5 / -0

My favorite period in history is the crusades. The first four. The first crusade has several moments where it legitimately seemed driven by providence. You also find all sorts of weirdos like Peter the Hermit.

I'm also interested in the movements of ancient peoples. For example, Gauls invaded Turkey through the Balkans in the third century BC. How'd they get there?

Absolutely critical to studying history is that modern historians are some of the goofiest dumbass people alive today. Same with anthropologists. History used to be pretty good, up until the 70s. Communists generally put their attentions elsewhere before then. I had a great crusades professor who called the Levant "the Holy Land" and Europe "Christendom." This was all of 10 years ago.

In high school I had a great western civ teacher that was a Jewess. Stuff she taught me I still reference.

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TheWestYearZero 3 points ago +3 / -0

The Gallic peoples (celts) populated all of Europe from the Neolithic period.

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Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

They didn't inhabit Turkey until they invaded it, same with the Balkans.

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TheWestYearZero 1 point ago +1 / -0

Ah, The Latin Kingdoms. Great stuff. Here is a good one for you:

"God's Wolf: The Life of the Most Notorious of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon"

Jeffrey Lee

https://en.id1lib.org/book/3714228/899427

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TendieMan 5 points ago +5 / -0

My favourite historical period is late antiquity. Very many parallels with our current age. Usually when researching something I look online and if it particularly interests me I'll look at books.

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GayReddit 5 points ago +5 / -0

One of my favorite areas of history has to be the late middle ages. Almost all of Europe was Catholic, which means that even though the different kings and princes fought one another they still shared a common worldview. In fact, the code of chivalry was based on Christian ideas on loving your enemy and the complementarity of the sexes. The Christian ethos inspired the Crusades and the Reconquista. Later on the Protestant reformation would shatter this unity and lead down the road to liberalism, freemasonry, deism and atheism.

This was the age when localism prevailed, and most affairs didn't involve a ruler hundreds of miles away. Later on in the modern era, absolutist kings gave way to bloody revolutions and the masonic (((liberalism))) of today.

The economy had a corporatist model with the guilds, which inspired Mussolini and Hitler's ideas. Unlike today, usury was greatly restricted.

I'm not saying that the Middle Ages were perfect, far from it. A somewhat similar model would be miles better than democracy though.

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DEPORT_DOOMERS 4 points ago +4 / -0

I love reading historical recollections that coincide with the Bible. The logical conclusion is that Christ was real and died for our sins.

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johnmic07 4 points ago +4 / -0

I love history, mainly american history but also european history and Chinese history as well as ancient roman/greek history. Wikipedia is a powerful tool for any historical event that happened before Karl Marx. Anything after that has been manipulated to put a pro communist slant on it. Reading autobiographies is the best way to learn history. Obviously it won't be as comprehensive as a book written by a historian, but far more insightful. I've been reading Mein Kampf and just for the historical insight into Germany during WW1 and WW2 it is solid gold. WW2 in color on Netflix is also really well done, as is their documentary on the Vietnam war.

I think the most important thing to recognize about history is that it's extremely subjective, much more so than people think. Events from hundreds of years ago are described completely differently by different groups of people, even basic facts such as how many men died in a battle, or how many people lived in a town. More recent events, such as things that happened within our lifetime, are even worse because of political manipulation regarding those events. It isn't possible to understand something that happened in history, unless both sides are researched and there is a basic understanding of the culture of both sides. For example, commies lie in all of their official reports for propaganda purposes. Consume History kings!

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Blursed2021 5 points ago +5 / -0

I would say primary sources are the best way to understand history, autobiography is a relatively recent phenomenon and people have all sorts of reasons for writing them.

I do like biographies in general, auto and otherwise, as it's useful to see how the great people of history have done things.

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lemonjuice 4 points ago +4 / -0

What are your favorite ways to study history? E.g., Wikipedia / searching online, class, documentaries, books.

https://infogalactic.com/info/Main_Page

https://en.metapedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

https://libgen.rs/ for downloading books.

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Cockandballtorture10 3 points ago +3 / -0

Been learning a lot about Poland Lithuania lately. Cool place, with the exception of you know who having taken over Vilnius by the 1890s

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AlmostBased 3 points ago +4 / -1

I love my own ancestral history. It is not much, but I love studying Cree and Innuit.

However, I am much less a history type of guy, but rather a culture kind of person. I love learning about the rich European culture and history. Such a shame European architecture is being invaded by globohomo

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deleted 2 points ago +3 / -1
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AlmostBased -1 points ago +2 / -3

Cannibalism is not as common in indigenous americans as you may think. All this (((human sacrifice))) shit was only done by the upper class, and the lower class resented it. Many native american tribes joined the white settlers to fight against the upper class and other tribe leaders. Our fellow (((leaders))) in government still do human sacrifices, they just got better at hiding it.

Cannibalism and "colonization" are Jewish propaganda used to divide non-kikes.

Also, people on literally every continent slaughtered each other.

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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FloorGypsy 1 point ago +1 / -0

West coast is going to be "returning to tradition" in a few years, I bet.

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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FloorGypsy 1 point ago +1 / -0

used to divide the goyim

It's the opposite, racial divides are natural and the kikes try to mix us together

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TendieMan 2 points ago +2 / -0

They push us together so we fight. If we were separate there would be no racial conflict.

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thenameisdonald 3 points ago +3 / -0

Kind of degenerate but I fell into an absinthe hole last night for several hours. Weeks ago on a /pol thread about parasites I read how French soldiers in Algeria in the mid 1800’s would drink it to stave off malaria and dysentery. Then I went down a biblical, parasitical “worm”hole, ehh heh heh. Wormwood has been used to treat worms since perhaps the days of the Egyptians.

I’m an alcoholic so I went into the desert last week for a while to clean up, been sober 9 days! So in my alcoholic logic I thought “oh if I DO drink it will be absinthe in moderation since that will help kill parasites”.

Then I got into the late 1800’s as I’ve always loved the impressionists/post-impressionists like Vincent Van Gogh, Edouard Manet, and especially Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. I’m a sap for the romantic artist type stuff. I love the movie Midnight in Paris.

So anyways there’s a theory that “big wine” is the one who started the smear campaign against absinthe as it was far cheaper and stronger than wine. In the mid 1800’s an aphid wiped out most of the grapes and caused a massive wine shortage, then people got on the absinthe big time. Some Swiss peasant murdered his pregnant wife and children and the cops had learned he had drank some absinthe that day (along with a plethora of other liquors) so he didn’t remember the incident. And that was the year absinthe was banned in Switzerland. Most people aren’t aware that the prohibition era wasn’t relegated to just America. Obviously the Puritan movement after the Great War was responsible for it being banned as well. The FDA was scared of “muh thujones”, the active ingredient in wormwood, which is also present in other plants (like sage), and is lethal at high doses, but you’d sooner die of alcohol poisoning before the thujones got you. Obviously in my beautiful schizo mind I thought, if the government is banning it, maybe it’s good for you.

So when I was drying out all week in the desert I was taking some anti-parasite pills and tinctures, which both have wormwood, the tincture had black walnut hull. I shit on the ground so I could prod it with a stick but didn’t see any worms in my shit! To be honest I was mildly disappointed. Regardless I’m feeling really good at the moment. Crazy how productive one can be when you’re not hungover half the week.

Grand wormwood’s Latin name is artemisia absinthium, where Absinthe gets its name. And now I want to buy a $300 absinthe fountain to make it like the old school Europeans did. The “flaming sugar cube” trick is not traditional, that was popularized in I think the early 1990’s in Czech Republic and is called “bohemian style”. Traditionally you slowly drip ice cold water into your glass of Absinthe (with or without sugar, depends on bitterness and your tastebuds) as it creates the “louche” which is French for suspicious, that’s when the natural plant oils are realized and the drink goes from translucent to the famous milky opaque look.

A lot of the artists who drank Absinthe were also smoking hash or opium which could explain the anecdotal evidence of “Absinthe makes you crazy” idea, not to mention it’s strong as fuck, sometimes as high as 140-proof (70% alcohol). Not to mention because of its popularity, bootlegging was common, and improper production of booze can get you killed pretty fast.

The Earthquake cocktail is attributed to Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec which is equal parts Absinthe and cognac, yes he died of alcoholism at age 36.

Absinthe is a “neutral spirit” so it can be made with sugar beets, wheat, etc., but traditionally was made with grapes, and most proper distillers these days still use grapes as the base.

It became legal in the U.S. again in 2007, so long as it contains no “muh thujones” which means “it can’t have a lot in it”, since it’s naturally in wormwood, but studies of old absinthe bottles show they potentially had less thujones in it back in the day than it does now. Cheap absinthe is probably just vodka with licorice flavoring and green food coloring, the good stuff is expensive! Like $70 a bottle.

A quote from an article I read: “ Visiting artists and intellectuals—among them Ernest Hemingway and Oscar Wilde, who once wrote, “A glass of absinthe is as poetical as anything in the world”—began to prize and popularize the green elixir in their native countries. New Orleans’ Old Absinthe House became quite the hotspot in the mid- to late 1800s, playing host to Mark Twain, Walt Whitman and William Thackeray, among others. After U.S. marshals nailed shut the doors of the Federal-style townhouse during Prohibition, it reopened in 1933 and was restored to its original glory in 2004.”

I know it’s not as traditional and based as a lot of the other historical posts you Chads have been writing, but I was up for five hours last night reading about the green fairies history. No I’m not an Absinthe salesman!

I do need to be careful tho, I am an alcoholic so whenever I get sober, shortly after I start to romanticize the drink in my head, and rationalize how I’ll be “responsible” and “intellectual” about it this time. Pray for me.

Looking forward to reading all the other posts here, love you guys.

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happybillmoney [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Pretty interesting. I like absinthe because I like black licorice. Thought the fuss was about it being really strong and having tainted batches in the past or something. Didn't know about this thujones stuff or other history. Always thought it was a different kind of drunk. Now I know why.

Weird shit fattish you got going on. Anyway do avoid drinking so much bro. Never let booze take over your life. Not just because of the obvious reasons. But also once you build that tolerance you can't just enjoy a single drink. And that sucks.

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thenameisdonald 2 points ago +2 / -0

What do you mean by fattish? I hate candy licorice but love the real flavors from herbs like fennel.

Yeah, I know even if I went a year sober it would probably still be hard to have just one beer. We’ll see how it goes. It’s been 9 days sober and honestly I have no desire for it (nicotine on the other hand). I honestly think it’s related to sugar. I pretty much haven’t had any refined sugars since I quit the booze, just a little raw honey in tea and some fruit. There seems to be a direct correlation. I think I had a candida overgrowth and that shit will literally tell your brain to gorge on sugar.

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happybillmoney [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

I shit on the ground so I could prod it with a stick

I was just yanking your chain my dude.

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thenameisdonald 1 point ago +1 / -0

Oh fetish, ha ok got it.

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TransApache 1 point ago +1 / -0

Im not into history much, but I would really like to know what actually happened during WWII. Reading places like this I get bits at a time.

I didn't even know what Holodomor was until a few years ago, but dont you dare not get enough of the holocauster...

It's so bad about the actual biggest genocide, that my browser's autocorrect doesnt recognize the word.

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Blursed2021 0 points ago +1 / -1

The holodomor was not the biggest actual genocide.

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deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
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Joesf23 1 point ago +1 / -0

Reading history especially 1st person accounts is the few things that help me disengage from the current news insanity. Also keeps things in perspective when you books about eastern front ww2.

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Julius_Severus 1 point ago +1 / -0

My go to history book recommendations:

Empires of the Sea and Conquerors by Roger Crowley. The former is about the conflict between the Ottoman Turks and the Knights of St John, the latter is about the early stages of the Portuguese Empire. These are two areas of history that are fascinating and important but don't get a ton of discussion in the Anglosphere. Crowley has a great writing style; he builds excitement the way a novelist would.

The Unnecessary War, by Pat Buchanan. This is a great normie friendly resource that goes into all the details about the run up to WWII that government schools like to ignore.

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TheWestYearZero 2 points ago +2 / -0

This book is excellent:

"The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company"

Download https://en.id1lib.org/book/5240013/0fd548

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TheWestYearZero 2 points ago +2 / -0

Also very good. Ignore the unappealing cover:

"A History of Portugese Overseas Expansion 1400 -1668"

Malyn Newitt

https://en.id1lib.org/book/945716/e85cd3

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consoomer998763 1 point ago +1 / -0
  1. What’s your favorite area of history to study? Usually, I like to learn about medieval Europe, 100 years war, the Vikings, so on. My absolute favorite, however, is an exception to that: The Roman Empire. I really like just learning about conquerors in specific a lot. Beyond Europe, I like some aspects of Asian history too, the warring states period of both China and Japan, and about Genghis Khan. Obviously I like the rise of fascism in 20th century Europe too.
  2. Share a world impacting event that others might not be familiar with The holocaust goyim, ever hear of it?? Jokes aside, I'm not really sure. I think more people should read about Aurelian though, his military accomplishments were insane
  3. What are your favorite ways to study history? Youtube can be a good resource. Wikipedia is good to quickly catch up, but if I want to actually learn it I would watch a video, obviously books are the best but aren't as easily accessible. Go to bitchute for Nazi Germany, etc
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BidenLikesMiners 1 point ago +1 / -0

Wikipedia is useful for history only if you spend the time to confirm their sourcers, without that it is as accurate as some sjw's tumblr.

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BidenLikesMiners 1 point ago +1 / -0

Wikipedia is useful for history only if you spend the time to confirm their sourcers, without that it is as accurate as some sjw's tumblr.

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dutchgroyper 1 point ago +1 / -0

Thinking a lot about which point in Western history was its peak. Combining every aspect of life. Considering 1840 till 1910 or the time period right before the Industrial revolution. I just really like the aesthetics, culture of old history mixed in with modern inventions. Quite unique and relatively short timeframe of human history, considering the inevitable, steep decline shortly afterwards.

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SecretSempai 1 point ago +1 / -0

Roman and pre-Neolithic are my favourites.

I’m not going to lie, I enjoy the second one mainly because all the racist and sexist ideas of the past are being verified at a comical rate, and watching the insect infested halls of academia scatter to explain around it is glorious.

Basically, the old idea of Europe was that a group of pale skinned men came down from the European steppe and conquered the surrounding areas. This was considered much racist post WW2, and deboonked until genetic analysis in 2015-2017 all but confirmed that this theory fits the data best. The paper that broke the news contained a comically long addendum explaining that they aren’t nazis.

It’s amazing to watch every belief you have about how worthless academia is, and how uninterested they are in what is true be verified in real time.