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posted ago by happybillmoney ago by happybillmoney +70 / -0

Hello fellow consumers,

As always thank you to everyone that participated in the last weekly and remember you are Operation MONKE!

u/SturmGewehr03, u/Smol_Gobbo, u/Berglewits, u/AlmostBased, u/Emacs, u/when_we_win_remember, u/Meths_Dirty_Cousin, u/drjillsusedscrunchie, u/TransApache, u/BasedTemplar, u/Spicy_maymay, u/Blursed2021, u/SFAM1A, u/PrezElectHamsandwich, u/JohnnyNubPotato, u/80960KA, u/atomical, u/Kapral_Wojtek, u/PepesCovfefe, u/ChicagoMAGA, u/zzbg, u/Dahnald2020, u/Celticguy, u/InversionAgenda, u/TheWestYearZero, u/TrueRealist, u/soylentss, u/TheoryOfAnAnon, u/johnmic07, u/sneedger, u/tompettyrefugee, u/asonetuhid, u/GeorgeFentanylFloyd, u/FloorGypsy, u/BLMadeMeRaysis, u/sunshinenationalist, u/DirConn, u/Slimeball, u/Half_alive, u/ModsBanPaleos, u/ThirteenEqualsFifty, u/YEETveteran8888, u/TheRealPizzaPope, u/DJT_JR6544, u/TendieMan, u/KonyHawk_ProSlaver, u/Needmorepopcorn, u/ParasiteCleanse, u/Shep1488, u/Greasyone, u/jekyll-islander

NOTE: If one thing is clear there is no such thing as Based College. Great discussion Kings.


This Weeks Discussion Theme: Consume Genealogy

This weekly is on genealogy. And comes to you by avid request from u/Blursed2021. Our focus is on sharing methods for researching your family history. Knowing your family’s lineage can give you a deeper sense of purpose. In that knowing where you came from enables you to better plan where to go. There are likely many interesting stories and connections in your family's past you’re unaware of. As u/Blursed2021 points out “[there are many] stories to be shared [and learned], such as that kooky old aunt who said we are royalty (turns out she was right) or your mom saying we have Cherokee blood (not a drop)”.

Discussion ideas:

  • Recommend methods of research e.g., personal genomics kits, family tree sites, or just asking your family.
  • Personal genomics kits cons and pros. Is there a risk in giving up your DNA?
  • Have you learned anything surprising about your family during your research?
  • Is genealogy important?

Weekly Polls:


Previous Weeklies:

Comments (79)
sorted by:
37
AlmostBased 37 points ago +37 / -0

I don't trust DNA test kits. Its probably used by the government to steal my genetic information anyways. It is also full of propaganda. They always insert trash like 1% algerian or jew genes in your results to "own the nazis"

I am Native American (Cree and Inuit) and that is all I need to know. My great grandpa immigrated to Europe and fought for the Germans in WWII, which is how I somehow ended up with a German last name apparently.

It is important to know your people's history and what your people have achieved. However, your specific genes don't really matter and are quite trivial. What you do with your life is much more important.

15
TheClintonHitman 15 points ago +15 / -0

dude you come from an interesting bloodline

7
deleted 7 points ago +7 / -0
3
Joesf23 3 points ago +3 / -0

Which company did he use? Is one of them safer or more accurate than the other?

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deleted 6 points ago +6 / -0
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Joesf23 4 points ago +4 / -0

I heard 23 and me was the one that liked to throw 1% jew dna into everyone. Mother in law used ancestery and it was pretty accurate to her own research and firsthand knowledge. Just broke it down into a % pie chart and highlighted the country/regions where that side of the family came from...I laugh at these people who claim they are now "vikings" because of their .00005% nordic blood after dna test.

4
Blursed2021 4 points ago +4 / -0

They throw random African/Asian ancestry. Jews are very proud of their inbreeding so they wouldn't be making all of us chosen.

6
sunshinenationalist 6 points ago +6 / -0

How!?, What!? Why!? Oh my gosh so many questions

11
TheWestYearZero 11 points ago +11 / -0

It is a reverse hollywood WW2 movie. He taught the SS and Einsatzgruppen to use Cree and Inuit on the Eastern Front to defeat commie codebreakers!

11
Joesf23 11 points ago +11 / -0

In hollywood movie though, they have a mobilzed tee-pee shaped gas chambers to exterminate 6 gorillion people while playing war drums. Then after the movie, native americans are determined to be literal nazis while everyone claps.

9
AlmostBased 9 points ago +9 / -0

Bro, they made teepees out of HUMAN SKIN bro. Trust me bro. The nazi's burned all 6 quintillion human skin teepees moments before the Allies arived bro. They used human bones for the pins and stakes bro. Yes, german soldiers found time to sit down and do home-made crafts while fighting a two front war bro.

7
Joesf23 7 points ago +7 / -0

Oy vey! I never knew this! Im assuming one tomahawk could sharpen 2 million bones a day!

2
DJT_JR6544 2 points ago +2 / -0

Why would nazis want to make lampshades or teepees out of people they supposedly hated? Never made sense to me.

2
Captain_Raamsley 2 points ago +2 / -0

tee-pee shaped gas chamber

Unfathomably based

10
AlmostBased 10 points ago +10 / -0

In the 1920's, the Canadian government made attendance at school mandatory for Indigenous people. Similar to what is happening to white people now, it was absolutely filled to the brim with propaganda intended to erase their culture and to turn their kids against their parents. My great grandpa, in the best interest of himself and his children, disguised himself as a chink and applied to be an exchange student in Berlin. This was a time period where Chinese students were the fourth largest group of students in Germany due to China's push to westernize and due to colonization and German influence.

This was a pretty bad mistake for my great grandpa, as anti-chinese sentiment rose after 1933. He stayed anyways, changed his name to a German one, and ended up fighting in the world war. I don't know how he managed to come back to the US though.

Hitler also promised to give North America back to the natives if they win the war, though that is almost a decade after my great grandpa moved there.

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AlmostBased 9 points ago +9 / -0

I left out a bunch of details because there are not a lot of Native Americans/Chinese in Germany, so it would be incredibly easy to dox myself

3
TendieMan 3 points ago +4 / -1

The Anglos invented modern luberalism and multuculturalism originally as a tool to supress the Celtic minorities of Britain. They then used it against other groups and now it's being used against us.

2
Blursed2021 2 points ago +2 / -0

Not an Anglo invention. This cultural erasure started in France after the French revolution.

2
TendieMan 2 points ago +2 / -0

Absolutely sucks that the regional French languages are nearly extinct. Nationalism at the expense of localism.

1
ChadRight92 1 point ago +1 / -0

It's really easy to get your DNA though. If they wanted it, they can just go through your garbage and find a discarded soda can that'll have your dna on it.

I have heard they randomly throw in 1% African or Jewish onto peoples results to "pwn the racists" but I used AncestryDNA and there was none on mine. I'm like 95% Northwest European and 5% East European.

The results can be interesting because I have a Eastern European last name and always thought I had more East Euro in me, but actually the vast majority of my bloodline is NW Europe.

I know it's accurate because it shows "DNA Matches" and some of my distant relatives are on there.

2
AlmostBased 2 points ago +2 / -0

It is really easy for the government to spy on you. All they have to do is plant a tiny little camera in your house. They don't do that. Why? It is because we planted the cameras ourselves with our phones, laptops, etc. They also risk being caught.

It is not easy for the government to get your DNA. They have to hire someone to make it possible, while also risk getting caught or arousing suspicion. There is also no guarantee that it is my DNA, it could have gotten contaminated and damaged. So the best solution is to make sheep literally pay you to take their DNA.

1
Cockandballtorture10 1 point ago +1 / -0

You probably have more eastern admixture than you think. Remember, half of our relatives in eastern europe were probably killed in the Holodomor. There was also a considerable amount of Poles, Belorussians, and Lithuanians living in Britain with anglicised names in the 19th century (so you very well could have Brits saying “oi all me great gran’parents ‘ave English names Oi’m English!” when turns out their grandfather was Joseph Conrad).

Get your raw results and run them through gedmatch. It won’t tell you everything but it may show you that you have more east shifted dna than the other companies are getting. If not then yea you’re a total Northwestern bastard.

1
Lopied1 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yeah public records would be better

25
GeneralStorm 25 points ago +25 / -0

I've traced 6 generations of my ancestors. That's 127 people and they were all simple peasants (excluding me and my parents). They all lived within 15 km from each other, worked land and raised their families as best as they could during various wars, epidemics and other hardships. I'm proud of them all. It makes me appreciate the place that I was born in.

I also did a (((DNA test))). It was nothing special. For a more historical context, I tried uploading it to MyTrueAncestry (a Swiss company that gives you DNA matches from various archeological sites). I have a DNA match from 5000 BC, from an archeological site 100 km away from my hometown.

6
TheWestYearZero 6 points ago +6 / -0

Son of the soil!

3
Blursed2021 3 points ago +3 / -0

Did the research material end at 6 or is that where you stopped?

3
GeneralStorm 3 points ago +3 / -0

Both. Many records were destroyed in my area, so 6th generation is about as deep as I can go with the available material.
Also, 6th generation is the sweet spot for me, because it's the last generation, in which you are genetically related to all of your ancestors. In the 7th generation there are already at least 8 people, who did not contribute to your genetic makeup.

5
Blursed2021 5 points ago +5 / -0

A different perspective than my own, but bravo nonetheless for knowing your ancestors.

22
ModsBanPaleos 22 points ago +22 / -0

I dunno how deep genetics go as far as genealogical trades but i skinned a cat the fastest in anatomy class then later i found out my ancestors in italy were famous tanners

11
FloorGypsy 11 points ago +11 / -0

I hate sounding like a redditor, but is it true that there's more than one way to skin a cat?

6
Blursed2021 6 points ago +6 / -0

Yes

4
WhiteyMcWhite 4 points ago +4 / -0

If you were a redditor you could skin a male dog by skinning a female cat.

15
YurtsForTrump 15 points ago +15 / -0

My parents placed a large illustrated family tree stretching back 5-6 generations in our living room. It’s quite a sight to see, a reminder that I come from a long line of proud peasants, soldiers, and God-fearing men and women (though there are a concerning amount of jews on the tree), and that I must not let them down.

6
BasedTemplar 6 points ago +6 / -0

Breed out the jewish blood. Purge the poison!

6
Joesf23 6 points ago +6 / -0

Ive noticed that if you do any intetnet search on a last name that is even remotely close to germanic/central euro/east euro the search always says its an ashkenazi jewish name. For being 2% of the worlds population they seem to have a lock on 80% of the last names from germany. Weird.

2
Captain_Raamsley 2 points ago +2 / -0

Yeah, I think that's propaganda

12
laughingdingo 12 points ago +12 / -0

I am descended from nobility but through a bastard line, hence why I'm posting from Australia now. I had my family history drilled into me from a young age because it fell to me to continue the Traditions of our most famous member so that's what I do.

I never had the interest to take a DNA test, don't trust them anyway. They only give approximate answers based on their existing pool of data. Family stories are more reliable, if families don't stay together then the true history is lost. I remember when I heard my grandfather used to keep a copy of the Rubaiyyat by his bed, just like I do. It's not really ethnic composition that is important to keep families together but tradition and fractal habit of the soul. DNA history alone will reveal only strangers and answer no questions.

3
TheWestYearZero 3 points ago +3 / -0

One of your forebears was a remittance man!

(explanation for non aussies)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remittance_man

9
Remantro 9 points ago +9 / -0

I think genealogy is important because it gives us roots, it is the prologue to the story of one's life. Who would want to be a rootless, nationless creature? Are you even human then? Of course I say this as a mutt who doesn't know his father.

9
Berglewits 9 points ago +9 / -0

My father has an enormous amount of papers detailing his families Genealogy squirreled away somewhere that my grandparents left him. It's fortunate because that side of the family is a mess with people from basically the entirety of the British Isles and very difficult to track as they overwhelming come from the colonial period or right after it. I know that the guy who was in charge of Andersonville Prison camp is in there along with a great great uncle who was a high rank KKK member and Jefferson Davis by Marriage (which isn't based because he was a mediocre leader). My mom's side of the family is much easier to track, atleast so far as ethnicity, as all my great grandparents were first generation immigrants from Germany for two of them, and Hungary and Italy for the other two.

One of these days I am going to bother to go make heads or tails of it to see what's up. I will be honest other than general ethnicity questions I am so incredibly abstracted from any older lineage going back to Europe that I don't care about relations to which group or which region. I am not going to mock someone for caring about their deeper ancestry I just don't care particularly as my persona is so linked to America and not to those places.

8
FloorGypsy 8 points ago +8 / -0

Hey, I was mentioned! Cool!

The only real thing that I think is noteworthy in my genealogy is that I am a direct descendant of John Robinson, the pastor who blessed the Mayflower, as depicted in this (somewhat) famous painting.

https://plymrock.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Embarkation_of_the_Pilgrims_1924x1277-1924x962.jpg

One day, I will see him again in Heaven. Until then, I'm trying to make both God and him proud.

6
1776pill 6 points ago +6 / -0

Before you take one of those tests, you should talk to your family first. We can trace back to England and Germany, but when I took the ancestry test, it said mostly British, and then Western Europe, with a circle over Germany and part of France. Had I not known, it would have been easy to mistakenly think I was part French.

Moral of the story: talk to your own family, especially the older ones.

4
YEETveteran8888 4 points ago +4 / -0

Is it weird that I was attracted to the idea of having kids with my quarter native, quarter Mexican, half Norwegian GF at the time? I’m Norwegian, Dutch, German for the record

6
BasedTemplar 6 points ago +6 / -0
  1. Was she attractive?
  2. Does she look mostly white? 3.Is she religious?

If you answered yes to 2/3 of these, no it's not weird.

4
YEETveteran8888 4 points ago +4 / -0

Ha, yeah She had the biggest ojos I’ve ever seen and got them from her Mexican side. Not bugged, just big pretty eyes. Very submissive and agreeable too. Just an alcoholic so I had to move on.

3
BasedTemplar 3 points ago +3 / -0

Ahhh, that's a shame.

3
YEETveteran8888 3 points ago +3 / -0

There are other señoritas out there with pretty eyes 🤷‍♂️

0
Blursed2021 0 points ago +1 / -1

If you wanted to breed because she was more of a mutt than you, yes, that's weird.

2
YEETveteran8888 2 points ago +2 / -0

Sorry I think fair skinned latinas are hot 🤷‍♂️

4
MOORWHITEBABBEES 4 points ago +4 / -0

I used a free trial of Ancestry.com to learn more about my family's genealogy and learned a lot of interesting things. I have ancestors mainly from Germany, England, Poland, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.

I learned that some of my English ancestors were born in the US 28 years after the Mayflower landed. So, they were some of the first English colonist children born on American soil. I had ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary and Civil War. I had a reverend in the family a few generations back.

I also learned the main thing I was after: What kind of family did my orphaned grandfather come from? His mother died in the birth of his baby brother when he was three. He was the youngest of 7. His father was an alcoholic who ended up in prison for beating his second wife (hence losing his kids). One of his sibling's daughters got in touch with me to ask about her cousins (my mom and her siblings).

I'd say it's well worth it to learn about your ancestral past.

3
Blursed2021 3 points ago +3 / -0

I had a very similar experience to yours. It's very grounding.

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Half_alive 4 points ago +4 / -0

AFAIK, most DNA test kits (like 23&Me) are “phenotyping” kits, NOT gene sequencing (required for cloning and other crazy shit). Phenotyping is like a genetic fingerprint that it is inherited by people sharing the same ancestry and it’s easy to do provided you have enough data to work with. Gene sequencing is extremely time consuming and expensive and most companies probably aren’t doing this.

I bought 23&me for my wife a while back and it came back very accurate. Her mom is 100% Mayan and her dad is 100% Briton by lineage, and her result was basically 50% each as expected.

I’m probably not going to do it simply because my grandfather has already done years of research on our family genealogy through public record search, tracing our line back to Charlemagne.

3
atomical 3 points ago +3 / -0

I’ve taken a dna test before and it was pretty underwhelming results. Previously I knew that two of my bloodlines were from English settlers in the 1600s and German settlers in the 1700s. I took the test and found out I was like 60/40 English/German. Which I already figured it would be something like that so the test was pointless. When signing up for the test I chose no on every option for them to research my dna and even chose to have it destroyed after testing.

3
Blursed2021 3 points ago +3 / -0

Ancestry.com isn't that expensive and there's a very good chance someone has done the work for you, especially at the great grandparent stage. Matrilineally I was able to go back 13 generations and patrilineally I was able to go back 12.

What I've found most interesting was how the various ethnic groups of America stuck together up until the 30's. My German ancestors married other Germans, and not just any ol Germans, but those from their region. Same for my English ancestors. There really wasn't this euro-mutt thing we have today. What was also interesting was how important civic organizations were in certain parts of the country. These people would work 6 days a week and spend the rest of their time getting drunk dressed as Indians.

I heartily recommend everyone go see what you can find on ancestry. There's a lot of bullshit in family lore, as well as ignorance. Your credible grandmother might be repeating stories from a less credible relative. As well as secrets. I found out my dad was previously married in genealogy research. I found out an in law had a little brother that died when he was 8 that nobody knew about because she didn't discuss it.

As to the DNA testing, know that you might be accidentally narking on a cousin. As well, if there's any kind of potentially bad mysteries in your family, DNA testing may turn that up. Stuff you might not want to know about.

3
Removmudrace 3 points ago +5 / -2

My family are warriors, pioneers, and builders of America and Europe, have constructed towns, roads, and railroads that still stand to this day. We have a family history book maintained across the world with accounts of bravery and ingenuity. As much as the Catholic Church is a bastardized hybrid of Scripture, I am grateful they recorded the name of my nth great grandfather when they required it of those they helped overcome physical illness. The area he lived was ravaged by war, yet links to the movement of Germanic tribes before him. We survived and flourished in the harshest conditions thrown at us and will not go extinct like the enemies of the White race want.

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sunshinenationalist 3 points ago +3 / -0

Family history is something I keep on researching. It is rather saddening, that I've only became interested it in after my grand parents had died. For they know knowledge that is now lost to time. All I know is that my ancestor from my father's side was a famous poet back in his day but he lost to his communist rival. I find Great Pride when discussing family history because I am happy where my bloodline and where my forefathers were birthed, because of my surname, it was born from the victory of Covadonga. Against the Moors by the victorious Visigothic nobles. Really all family history is precious and whenever I have the chance I love to know the history of my friends and try to research how their last names spurred up.

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deleted 3 points ago +3 / -0
2
BigBeef 2 points ago +2 / -0

I don’y have any very specific family records, but my father’s side is either Welsh or Portuguese (we don’t know because the guy was only a little kid when he came over in the early 1700s and his parents died on the boat). I know for certain that my mother’s side is from German and Irish immigrants.

1
Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

Can't you tell by the surname if they were Welsh or Portuguese?

1
BigBeef 1 point ago +1 / -0

They think the surname might have changed when the guy came over

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cutefroggy 2 points ago +2 / -0

I don't really know my genealogy. It's pretty clear on my dad's side (Spaniard). He's white not brown at all ok guys. My mother's side? I'm not sure. I could make an educated guess but it's not like they ever told me. I guess there's a native American someone in there.

1
Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

It's pretty easy to do on ancestry.com and you can start with yourself. It'll make suggestions based on public records and do much of the work for you.

2
TendieMan 2 points ago +2 / -0

I don't know much beyond my grandparent's generation. I know my mother's side was distantly descended from Normans thst arrived in the Norman conquest. I think there might be some (((admixture))) on my father's side but I'm not sure.

2
deleted 2 points ago +3 / -1
1
penis_butler77 1 point ago +1 / -0

I've got an uncle that is very interested in our family's genealogy- I was pleased to learn from him that nobody in our family has a single drop.

1
codreanuAppreciator 1 point ago +1 / -0

As most people on this site, I am interested in family history. My mom's side of the family comes from Germany and in particular they lived in the northern part of the German empire. On that side there is also a bit of Finnish as well, but I don't know much about that. My Dad's side of the family comes mostly from Poland with a bit of Russian.

My family historically has been heavily craftsman on both sides. My Dad's side has a lot of people that worked with metal, so machinists and tons of blacksmiths. My Mom's side of the family had more of a variety of jobs.

1
FuqSpez 1 point ago +1 / -0

My grandfather was really into genealogy, and had a little book that traced his side of my family back to the 1600s. I never understood the point - it was just names and dates, no other info about health or occupation or what they accomplished. My parents have a couple of pictures of the first ancestor who came to America, who was a priest and started a farm - that was way cooler than the names on the family tree.

1
wehrmacht 1 point ago +1 / -0

No exact idea on genealogy itself but I’m Irish, Italian, German, Spanish, French, Argentine, and Native American. My great grandpa fought for Mussolini as an officer and others fought in the Wehrmacht(related through marriage). Some also fought for Franco and for the right wing populists of Argentina .

1
Captain_Raamsley 1 point ago +1 / -0

family tree sites, or just asking your family

Best way to do it IMO. I've always been interested in history and I am lucky to have a grandma that has tracked our tree (at least on the side I most care about).

Personal genomics kits cons and pros. Is there a risk in giving up your DNA?

It's all ran by Jews (un?)surprisingly. not only do they probably sell your DNA to the feds, but they also sneak in 2-3% nigger or Jew just to screw with Whites.

Have you learned anything surprising about your family during your research?

My Grandfather and his buddies were responsible for a still-unexplained UFO-type phenomenon. It's a nationally recognized event in the U.S., in the PNW. My family are the only ones who know the truth of what went down that day. Absolutely hilarious...

Is genealogy important?

10000% YES! Half of where you're going is relative to where you've been.

1
DJT_JR6544 1 point ago +1 / -0

My grandmother looked into our genealogy using ancestry.com. She did not do the dna test kit. But she found out some amazing history. She found out that one of our ancestors worked for George Washington as a secretary of some sort during the Revolutionary War. She gave it time and dedicated research. She compared family pictures with her cousins and other relatives. She said there was some difficulty in it, but if you are fascinated there is plenty to learn.

1
lemonjuice 1 point ago +1 / -0

Example of family research when they claim he was jewish:

https://files.catbox.moe/klkw17.jpg

1
crash7863 1 point ago +1 / -0

My mother's family can trace their linerage back to about year 1800. They were based out of Heidelberg. In the family tree, one of my grandfathers married a jewish woman. So when you guys hear me say that I'm jewish, that's exactly what's that about.

My father's family is nothing. Grandfather was adopted by extremely wealthy people. Adoptive great grandmother hated my grandfather and gave the family fortune to charity upon her death. No one speaks their names to this day. It is as if they never existed because of the betrayal.

1
pertivi 1 point ago +1 / -0

I traced my genealogy back to mid 1600's and what i have found is that my folks were just terrible. I do not want to know more.

All HSS genetic difference falls inhside 0.01%, 0.02% and you are a Neanderthal so i think it is pointless to pay for DNA testing.

1
subbookkeeper 1 point ago +1 / -0

One of the traps in DNA companies giving your DNA to the government is that the government doesn't actually need YOUR Dna specifically.

Your family members share your DNA, if they give it up, by extension the government has your DNA.

Personally I've done a DNA test and am waiting on results, the best thing I could do was put it under another name so hopefully it causes an error in the system if it's ever used against me in the future.

1
TechParadox 1 point ago +1 / -0

My mom did a bunch of genealogy stuff when I was a kid (so much so that several of our summer family vacations were spent traveling to other states just so she could spend time poring over birth & death records at some county courthouse). Unfortunately, most of that data got wrecked by a leaky roof in their garage, so it's a roll of the dice as to whether we'll be able to readily re-create it.

I started building a free family tree over at Ancestry using what I know of my family up to a couple generations back. My siblings and surviving aunts and uncles have helped with that, and we're pretty sure we have my dad's side of the tree tracked back to 1800's Germany/Prussia. Mom's side is a bit more spread out, and while she claimed her research tracked back to the 1700s in the US I haven't been able to fully verify that as of yet.

Out of all of it, the only thing that has really surprised me is the variation on last names on the female sides of the tree. It's interesting to track the families' paths back across several States to where they immigrated into the US.

As for genomics kits, I won't touch those with a ten foot pole. I barely trust Ancestry with my family's tree info. I'm not giving up my DNA to anyone's databanks.

1
drjillsusedscrunchie 1 point ago +1 / -0

My genes arent super interesting- I'm mostly German and English, with some swedish and eastern European thrown in. Not related to anyone famous. On the contrary, my wife's family has always kept meticulous records, but she did 23andme after her sister bought her a kit as a dare, and is probably the only person whose mother was telling the truth when she said they were part cherokee without being on the rolls. Her results came back as 99% English and Bavarian, and 1% native, back when they had no data for natives. She's from a very specific area in one state of the US that has an abnormally large population of Native Americans that weren't Trail of Tears'd, but were absorbed into the genetic makeup of the area, so there's a bunch of white people that tan and have brown eyes, but aren't any percentage Spanish, Italian, or Greek. She can also trace her lineage back to William the Conqueror, tho she was related to him thru marriage. I call her Pocahontas, lol.

Genealogy is important for health and the protection of a nation state, but you shouldn't let genes get in the way of determining family. My nieces and nephews are such regardless of their genetic relation to me. I helped out a sister in law over a genetic relative, because he's trash. My whore Grandmother didn't want to include my adopted cousin on the family tree, even though she's nothing but polite and successful, just because she was adopted as an infant from another country. Said Whore Grandma has dementia in her genes, and she's not so hot herself. Was she correct? Sure, but nothing was gained by having that attitude. It wasn't about "genetics", it was about invalidating her as a member of the family, just for being adopted. Same Whore treated my sister poorly because she has brown eyes like our mom, even tho she's 100% related to her. Genes are important, but I've laid out several scenarios where genetics really don't matter in regards to family, only culture and actions. That being said, I personally wouldn't adopt, just because.

1
Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

Not to rain your parade but genealogy isn't the study of genes, it's the study of family history. Genetics is the study of genes.

1
drjillsusedscrunchie 1 point ago +1 / -0

You're good, I wasn't having a good time when I wrote that, so I'll probably edit or delete my comment later.

1
Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

No need to do that, I just noticed a lot of people seem to confuse the two.