117
posted ago by happybillmoney ago by happybillmoney +117 / -0

Hello fellow consumers,

As always thank you to everyone that participated in the last weekly and remember you are Operation MONKE!

u/Leadforpeds, u/DannyTheSkyman, u/Blursed2021, u/Pango, u/squiddface, u/______historymonth, u/PeaceAndHarmony, u/ParadigmShift2070, u/FloorGypsy, u/tootoo22, u/Call_Me_Kaiser, u/leatherbottom, u/ThusSpokeTheMan, u/Kapral_Wojtek, u/Greasyone, u/LovecraftCat, u/thenameisdonald, u/Arizona_Dude, u/123Yeetgody, u/spezschinesebukkake, u/undecidedmask, u/Blue_Country_Refugee, u/MeatwadMeatwad, u/clean_fingernail, u/Rubberbunnies, u/RunningBuffalo, u/Tourgen, u/SeproDep, u/gragas17, u/Vanilla, u/7gorilianthacct, u/Branman65, u/Barian84, u/bonerdude, u/RetardMoron, u/braindead_zoomer, u/Jeremiah17-9, u/Canapeder, u/KasierVonGoguryeo191, u/weizkangz, u/anon455, u/ModernBrunelleschi, u/Tarrock, u/KarenSlayer


This Weeks Discussion Theme: Gardening

This weekly is dedicated to gardening. Discussion ideas:

  • What are you growing this year?
  • What have you planted already?
  • What gardening method/tech are you doing this year? E.g., inground, above ground, hydro, fertilizers, nutrients, pesticides etc.
  • Are you doing anything different this year?

Weekly Polls:


Previous Weeklies:

Comments (100)
sorted by:
24
happybillmoney [S] 24 points ago +24 / -0

A helpful resource to know when to plant is using a almanac.

https://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-calendar

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
-5
squiddface -5 points ago +3 / -8

Enough of this womanly shit. You should do your next weekly discussion on guns or carpentry or mechanics. Maybe survival skills. If your next one is "Top 10 dieting tricks to help you tuck in that tummy" I'm fucking outro.

9
happybillmoney [S] 9 points ago +9 / -0

hey make a suggestion for a weekly. It's open to everyone.

And you got to remember to stay positive. If you lose that they win.

8
SturmGewehr03 8 points ago +8 / -0

Can you make a Top 10 dieting tricks to help you tuck in that tummy pls 🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺🥺

3
KarenKarenKaren 3 points ago +3 / -0

Jimmy Aiken on the mystery of weight loss and fasting https://youtu.be/psT5b9K55J4

2
Qualityproduct 2 points ago +2 / -0

This has all been a fantastic exchange.

0
squiddface 0 points ago +2 / -2

Don't tell me what to do.

3
LukeLukens 3 points ago +3 / -0

Man I can tell someone stomped your tulips recently.

1
squiddface 1 point ago +2 / -1

Ha! I knew you faggots grew flowerbeds.

4
deleted 4 points ago +4 / -0
-3
squiddface -3 points ago +1 / -4

You will never sustain a family from a garden. A farm crop, yes. Gardening is for bitches.

2
deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
2
Schesian 2 points ago +2 / -0

Here’s a bit of womanly shit that you might appreciate more: you can buy gold and silver for less than its melt value at estate auctions. Just keep an eye on pickup locations and how you’ll get there! Don’t drive into or through the hood.

21
Jeremiah17-9 21 points ago +21 / -0

Carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, and I think we're doing beans? We have a separate raised bed we built, and we're feeding it compost that we generate ourselves. Not our poop mind you, just vegetable trimmings, egg shells, old fruit and stuff like that from cooking. Coffee grounds too, they help a lot.

This year we're going to be planting alternating rows of crops, and see how that does. The sweet potatoes get their own corner though, they just grow like mad out here. My extended family has a sizable plot of land out in the Midwest that we plan on moving to and doing sustenance farming sometime soon.

10
OrganicMolecules 10 points ago +10 / -0

Oh wow, does your wife take part in the garden?

15
Jeremiah17-9 15 points ago +15 / -0

Unfortunately, I am divorced (she was an unrepentant sexual deviant and a heretic, and had lied to me for 3 years before I proposed but I digress). But my girlfriend comes over on the weekends and helps out with the garden. I do more of the physical labor while she brings water and helps with the planting part. Oh and I forgot about the peppers. Lots of jalapeños and cayenne peppers.

10
OrganicMolecules 10 points ago +10 / -0

Oh I'm sorry. By wife I meant s/o. It's nice to see people bringing back gardens though.

8
Jeremiah17-9 8 points ago +8 / -0

No worries! And yeah we started the garden to give my folks something to do since they moved in with me. Also having a source of food should (when) the bread lines start is a good idea. Unfortunately it's too hot and dry where I live to grow tobacco properly because that would be a valuable trade commodity.

6
FullAutoFlintlock 6 points ago +6 / -0

I grew tobacco in TX, hydroponics.

4
GODwins76 4 points ago +4 / -0

Same.

3
Jeremiah17-9 3 points ago +3 / -0

I might need to do that soon. Right after I build my FGC9....

4
FullAutoFlintlock 4 points ago +4 / -0

damn dude. based af

-1
squiddface -1 points ago +2 / -3

*husband

1
OrganicMolecules 1 point ago +1 / -0

Pardon?

The person I'm replying to is a man.

-2
squiddface -2 points ago +1 / -3

sure they are

13
Arizona_Dude 13 points ago +13 / -0

I live in an apartment complex in a desert... so what is this “gardening”?

In all seriousness I do want to plant and grow something... maybe I’ll try a serrano/jalapeno/something pepper plant.

8
Fabius 8 points ago +8 / -0

Peppers will grow well.

Hope you like peppers though. I grow serranos and I get about 100-150 in a season off of one plant.

You could probably do corn too if you have the land.

6
Arizona_Dude 6 points ago +6 / -0

Good to know. I’d find recipes for then and add them to mac and cheese, etc.

5
ThickCheney 5 points ago +5 / -0

You can get an indoor Orange Tree

3
KonyHawk_ProSlaver 3 points ago +3 / -0

Citrus trees are very picky about being indoors. They want humidity and lots of full sun.

5
sad_apu 5 points ago +5 / -0

okra likes hot, dry conditions, enjoys poor soil so you can use whatever is in your yard if you have one and if you don't it will grow just fine in 5gal buckets AND it will give you a ton of food AND it grows fast once it gets going. I seriously can't recommend okra enough haha.

3
squiddface 3 points ago +3 / -0

grow a pair

2
Schesian 2 points ago +2 / -0

I’ve heard that figs and citrus can do well in pots — I haven’t tried it myself, though.

11
Leadforpeds 11 points ago +11 / -0

This year I'm doing corn, potatoes, tomatoes, herbs, lettuce, cabbage, carrots, peppers, and onions. I'm doing homemade fertilizer made from chicken manure for all the plants except corn. The corn I am planting in a valley near my house. That place always gets flooded when we get lots of rain, so I'm hoping it was be like the Nile river and have lots of silt and nutrients from the flooding. Its just a practice run with the corn, so I'm not too worried about it failing or getting eaten by animals. I bought a Farmer's Almanac to help with everything.

10
TheBubbleBursts 10 points ago +10 / -0

I don't have much to add here, but I'd simply like to thank OP for these pinned posts. They're my favorite here even if they're not all relevant to me.

9
BigBeef 9 points ago +9 / -0

Suggestion to add a gardening or farming post flair (if there isn’t one already, which I don’t think there is).

8
EthicalEconomist 8 points ago +8 / -0

Currently growing tomatoes, kale, and thyme in my little front patio. I also have a lemon tree planted here, which gives mostly extremely sour and bitter lemons, but it’s still worth something,

5
Fabius 5 points ago +5 / -0

Tomatoes are tough. Good luck from one tomato grower to another.

5
Mark4-39 5 points ago +5 / -0

Do you know if it is okay to start tomatoes from seeds outdoors now? My seedlings started from pods all died when I put them outside a few weeks back thanks to the Easter cold snap. I should have known.

Just wondering if TX weather is conducive to starting again now. The internet is useless... all the mom blogs say the same thing 🙄

3
sad_apu 3 points ago +3 / -0

I love to start tomatoes from seed. I dont know your hardiness zone but I'm in 5b and I started my tomato seeds 6 days ago. My last frost is usually the 3rd week of April and my 10 day forecast shows no freezing. You're most likely good to start them.

If you go with starts, you'll want to wait until lows are low-mid 40s before you plant them outside. I container garden so if I do starts this early i'll take them into the garage at night. This still makes them grow pretty slow though so I wouldn't get too invested in tomato starts until you're past your last frost and have nights in the 40s or higher.

2
Fabius 2 points ago +3 / -1

Don't use seeds. Use sprouts. They're about 5 in. tall.

Plenty of sun, unless it gets really hot, then you'll need a shade or limit the exposure somehow or the fruit will sunburn.

4
EthicalEconomist 4 points ago +4 / -0

My patio doesn't seem to get enough sun for my tomatoes, but I'm looking for ways to get the most of the sunlight I do get for them.

5
sad_apu 5 points ago +5 / -0

You could try varieties that come from higher latitudes, such as Moskvich or Glacier. They tend not to need the intensity of light that others need and Glacier is actually frost hardy so you can start it super early. There are tons of cool heirloom tomatoes from Russia, Ukrain, Poland, etc that you might experiment with.

8
MOORWHITEBABBEES 8 points ago +9 / -1

This year, my husband and I are aiming big: zucchini, green beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, melons, corn, spinach, lettuce, carrots, pumpkins, squash, red peppers, and beets.

Last year (busy with a newborn), we only grew spinach and pumpkins well (tomatoes and potatoes didn't yield much).

The previous year we grew zucchini, watermelons, cucumbers, kale, kohlrabi, tomatoes, and pumpkins. Our corn, broccoli, cauliflower, and lettuce got eaten up by groundhogs and bunny rabbits, though.

With more raised beds and fencing, we're hoping to fend off the garden nibblers this year.

-3
squiddface -3 points ago +2 / -5

Told you.

3
Schesian 3 points ago +3 / -0

Women do post here.

-1
squiddface -1 points ago +2 / -3

Unfortunately. They haven't learned their place yet.

6
samuelhyde69 6 points ago +6 / -0

I want to garden, but live in Canada where for 7 months its uninhabitable by plants, any advice?

3
Woketard 3 points ago +3 / -0

A greenhouse will give you an earlier start and later end for potted plants you bring inside. For a lower cost or space saver, look into hoop houses you can put over a single bed like this: https://cdn-fastly.hometalk.com/media/2017/06/27/3928444/easy-diy-hinged-hoophouse-for-raised-bed.jpg

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
1
Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

Grow during the growing season.

1
sad_apu 1 point ago +1 / -0

Brassicas like kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and anything that is frost hardy will probably give you a worthwhile harvest. You could also consider an inexpensive or diy green house. Even an unheated one can extend your season by a month or more on each end. There are people in arctic locations that garden :)

6
Barian84 6 points ago +6 / -0

I'm planning a potato tower. I live in a very small town but unfortunately my house is on a tiny plot and I just don't have space for much. Hoping to move to the country in a year or so.

Filing all this information away for future use.

6
DrNilesCrane___ 6 points ago +6 / -0

Growing my usual... First grow will be tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers. The second grow in late summer will be all purple hull peas. Will try watermelon like I always do, and they will probably die like always, but I will keep trying. Haha.

I only use raised beds because my yard is all red clay and pine tree roots!

4
Mark4-39 4 points ago +4 / -0

Sounds like MS soil lol... good luck with the raised beds!

6
mp40 6 points ago +6 / -0

i'm going to try growing cabbage. I've got rhubarb growing already.

6
sad_apu 6 points ago +6 / -0

Planted outdoors: Kale, cauliflower, broccoli, 4 kinds of radish ('wasabi", malaga, white hail stone, daikon), yellow onions, green onions, 3 kinds of carrot (deep purple, atomic red, uzbek golden), snap peas, snow peas, albino beets. Also have 2 blueberry plants, 2 raspberry starts, and some strawberries overwintered from last year. Also recused some sprouted sunflower seedlings out of the seams in my driveway that came from our birdseed, potted them in some big containers.

Indoors still in trays: nasturtium, cilantro, green onions, yellow storage onions, chives, 2 kinds of okra (clemson spineless, red burgundy), 9 kinds of basil (genovese, dwarf italian, spicy globe, lemon, lime, cinnamon, sweet thai, purple opal, tulsi - i like basil), casper and chinese string eggplants (just a couple of each, not sure yet if I like eggplant), turnip greens, dill, 8 kinds of tomato (san marzano, speckled roman, abe lincoln, Wagner's blue green, green zebra, Clementine cherry, honey drop cherry, Brad's atomic grape), 8 kinds of pepper (Jedi and early jalapenos, red flame cayenne, Hungarian hot wax, shishito, mad hatter, lunchbox (sort of like the small sweet pepper mix at the grocery store), pablano), blue hubbard squash to be used as a decoy for cucumber beetles, zucchini, thyme, and lastly an experiment plant called tamarillo (known as tree tomato in new zealand).

Not yet started is various cucumbers and I might try growing a small melon called Tigger. Haven't decided if I'll bother with beans until fall since we have bad bean beetles here. I may also try my hand at starting a small moringa tree.

I know this thread is probably mostly focused on veg gardening but I wanted to list my pollinator flowers that I've also got started indoors so far: bee balm, 4 kinds of zinnias, calendula, chrysanthemum, daisies, echinacea, marigolds, borage, 2 kinds of sunflower.

Everything except the berries and 1 variety of onion I started from seed this year. Most of the seeds came from Baker Creek, Seed Savers Exchange, Johnny's and MI Gardener. Everything except the okra, daisies, sunflowers, and marigolds is being grown in containers. I don't mess with chemical pest control, just BT, DE, neem and decoy plants. About half of what I'm growing this year are things I'm trying for the first time. This will be my first time trying to grow in ground. Thank you for coming to my Ted Talk.

Edit: I've been keeping worms overwinter to make my own castings and worm tea from my kitchen scraps, will be trying out my homemade fertilizer this year.

4
Jeremiah17-9 4 points ago +4 / -0

Heck yeah brother, that's a good amount of crops. I hope they bear you many fruits!

4
sad_apu 4 points ago +4 / -0

thanks! Hopefully we can get some more gardening threads going to share progress.

2
Mark4-39 2 points ago +2 / -0

Try c/DIY ... there are some gardening threads on occasion

5
Swagmastermcdankass 5 points ago +5 / -0

16 year old building my first garden with my dad in our backyard. Starting small with tomatoes, carrots and cucumbers. Looking forward to it!

5
weizkangz 5 points ago +5 / -0

What have you planted already?

Tomato, Salad and Cucumber. I even gave some plants away already.

Are you doing anything different this year?

I made a batch of u/notmydirtyalt's natural pesticide, let's hope that it works as intended.

While we're on the topic of gardening season, let's actually commit to bring some OG consumeproduct content to the board. All the blackpilling from winter gets boring so quickly. Maybe a new theme or banner could help bring a change in atmosphere.

5
ThickCheney 5 points ago +5 / -0

Not gardening but I have a lemon tree outside that grows huge lemons, but the lemons barely have any juice. How do I remedy this?

3
Blursed2021 3 points ago +3 / -0

Might need more water?

5
komodojones 5 points ago +5 / -0

First time garden enjoyer here, just built my first garden on Sunday. Snow peas, hot peppers, sweet peppers, radishes, lettuce ,cucumbers. Pretty excited to reap what I sow. If you are deciding to also build a garden consider starting very soon. Woke up, read the bible, had some coffee, and gardened all day, it was an incredibly based day.

5
Fabius 5 points ago +5 / -0

Tomatoes. Like every year.

4
notmydirtyalt 4 points ago +4 / -0

I am 2/3rd of the way through a greenhouse for winter, currently racing the frosts that are inbound to save my sweet potatoes, and tropicals from the winter.

4
deleted 4 points ago +4 / -0
4
OrganicMolecules 4 points ago +4 / -0

If by South you mean South Japan, how is Japan?

2
deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
4
ThickCheney 4 points ago +4 / -0

I’m thinking of either getting or building a type of shelf garden. I’ve got dogs that love to destroy plants so I can’t have them on the ground. Would it be easy to build? Also I’ve got rats in the area and I hate rats, how do I keep them away? Is the some kind of cover I can put on it?

2
Blursed2021 2 points ago +2 / -0

Poison works very well on rats, there's little rat houses you can put the poison in

4
VonTyger 4 points ago +4 / -0

I am getting some major gains just since firing up an Aerogarden (generic mass-produced hydroponics) and using it to grow lettuce and some green onion shoots bought from my local grocery store.

They both grow faster than I can eat them with a 9-plant model. Apparently green onions will grow for awhile just in water with no nutrient solution although they would probably die and not taste as good. With a nutrient solution, six stalks grow about as fast as I can eat them, then 7 lettuce pods are producing more lettuce than I can eat myself.

This is way more productive and easier than growing herbs, which has actually been hit and miss for me so far. Basil grows like a weed in a hydroponic solution but I don't do much with it, other plants have trouble now and then.

3
Blursed2021 3 points ago +3 / -0

I'm planting basically everything--chard, onions, tomatoes, potatoes, cucumbers, gourds, corn, catnip, celery, leeks and a few things I'm forgetting. I'll be planting melons and pumpkins later this year. Plan on eating and freeze drying it. Probably going to have a half acre planted.

3
Mark4-39 3 points ago +3 / -0

Can anyone give a good fertilizer ratio for typical southern summer plants? I'm doing a square foot plan in a raised bed, but I'm not sure how to fertilize mixed crop in a single space.

In bed 1 I plan to have tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and squashes. In bed 2 I plan to have peas, lettuces/spinach/kale, beets, radishes, and melons.

AAA!

2
sad_apu 2 points ago +2 / -0

If you want to be kind of badass about it you could get some worm castings and brew your own worm tea in buckets with aquarium pumps. I plan to try this eventually but for now I use a multipurpose liquid soluble fertilizer like Jack's or Jobe's both of which you can find in most hardware or garden stores.

Worm tea is killer because it's very mild but very nutritious and you can't really overdo it so no fear of messing up.

3
tabarnak 3 points ago +3 / -0

What are you growing this year?

Cucumbers, carrots, beets, potatoes, rhubarb, butternut squash, green beans, peas, radishes, thyme, peppermint, lemonbalm, dill, rosemary, basil, parsely, habaneros, jalapenos. We are going to have an absurd amount of herbs and peppers this year.

What gardening method/tech?

Got a medium/large garden, along with a planter box and a planter box on wheels. The one with wheels is for the peppers and some smaller stuff so when it gets cold later in the year we can just wheel them into the garage.

Are you doing anything different this year?

We're planting the cucumbers, peppers and smaller stuff (thyme, rosemary, basil, etc) first in plant trays and once it gets warm enough we'll transplant them outside

3
Mrs762x51mm 3 points ago +3 / -0

Gardening is evolving every year for us. Last year was a mixed bag as it usually is. Being at 6500 FT above sea level, clay soil, windy springs, dry conditions, occasional large hail and late/early frost often complicates things.

Last year the spring was more windy then usual and September 8th we had our first snow storm. I was able to save my cannabis but most everything else that I was growing died. 😔. Before the snow the Fennel did great and so did the dill. However, as I expected the pepper plants failed, and very few strawberries. I did find some local seed garlic to plant, a little late, in November, but it did well and is currently thriving. I am hoping to expand the garlic as much as possible to sell and make ‘black garlic’.

This year I started a duck egg farm and have 3 dexter cows. Along with the 20 chickens I had last year as well. Much of my gardening plans revolve around keeping my feed bill down for them and improving our pasture. They free range in our pasture. I feed organic, one bag is over $30, which they eat a little less then a bag a day. Not including the scratch I feed as a snack that I ferment to help with cost. The eggs are amazing and they make great baked goods.

I have started duckweed inside for the poultry , and will eventually bring it outside in an IBC tote. I have 10 crown cuttings of Comfrey on the way, I am hoping to expand that to at least an acre over time, along with stinging nettle. Comfrey is an amazing plant so many uses from animal fodder to healing ointment and it improves soil, great for compost. I have several varieties of Amarnath and one variety of millet, flax, and a few of quinoa, for the poultry. I also bought orange Hawaii marigold seeds to try for dark yolks. I have several varieties of sunflowers as well that we grew last year that did outstanding and will grow them again this year. We will grow them with breadseed poppy.

I started 4 varieties of kale indoors a few weeks ago. Along with the starts we are trying ‘high intensity‘ growing with the lettuce and kale this year. I sowed seeds last week along with some dill seeds I collected last year and a new variety, bouquet dill. I also planted garlic chives that we procured from a neighbor last week.

I have Chioggia beets and Oxheart carrot I may or may not grow this spring. Fall gardening here is usually a better bet. I also have dakon radish, cilantro, and Ishikura clumping onion for the fall.

Much of my gardening experience is centered around herbs which we have a lot going this year, along with our cannabis plants that are already started and thriving. I don’t currently partake but still enjoy growing our legal limit.

I have two types of chamomile and a few varieties of echinacea. I already planted some echinacea root last week as well. I germinated my loveage and anise hissop a few weeks ago and my seedlings are growing well. I have indoor basil, African basil, pineapple sage, rosemary, tarragon, thyme. bay tree, and marjoram in pots inside. This year I am adding lavender, clary sage, oregano, cardinal basil, Gilda globe, and bronze fennel.

We are building a diy greenhouse over one garden and covering the other garden with a smallish hoop structure. With this addition I will try to grow peppers and cucumber, which in the past have not done the greatest. I also have sugar baby bush, a small watermelon, I am going to try. I have rutabaga seed, which will be another experiment. Most everything will be from seeds except the blueberry bushes I am going to order and attempt to grow.

We are running some ducks on our beds before planting. We are also adding alpaca poop (Magic beans) to our soil we are getting for free from our neighbors. It is close enough my hubby can drive the tractor over and fill up a few scoops.

All this with a 3.5 month old. I just realized how crazy I am after typing this all out. 😂 Luckily my husband has his shop here and loves the farming aspect just as much as I do. Happy growing everyone!

3
sad_apu 3 points ago +3 / -0

I've heard a lot about comfrey, I'm going to need to check this out. Amaranth is one I plan to get into when I have some more space (hopefully next year). Also a fellow kale enjoyer, I wanted to do 4 varieties but went a little overboard starting the first 2 so the other 2 I'm waiting until my fall garden.

Your homestead sounds amazing.

2
Mrs762x51mm 2 points ago +2 / -0

Comfrey is a very useful plant. Other countries use it a lot more then the USA. It is easy to propagate. If you have deer that get into the garden you can use it as a decoy. The deer go crazy over it. Depending on your location you can find root cuttings on Craigslist, especially spring and fall but I have heard you can plant in summer as well. You can find them online too but a little more expensive.

This homestead was mainly a cow ranch with a horse barn with a metal hay barn hubby turned into his machine shop.

We wanted to implement permaculture into the landscape and improve it that way. This is our third summer here and we are slowly doing that. Next project is milk sheep. I get ahead of myself though, it is easy to scatter myself too much!

Kale is an awesome crop, our ducks love it too. I wish you happy growing this year. There is something about getting your hands in the dirt that is very therapeutic no matter the size of the plot.

3
Schesian 3 points ago +3 / -0

Looking at planting fruit trees you can’t get in the grocery store. Here in the US, that means pawpaws and American persimmons, primarily. Also replacing parts of my overgrown lawn with useful berry bushes — edible landscaping is almost as good as goats! Not very compatible with them, though.

2
voyager14 2 points ago +2 / -0

My dad and I are growing cucumbers, strawberries, blueberries, tomatoes, butterhead lettuce. We just planted the last one, the cucumbers, today. We are planting most above ground and made PVC pipe greenhouses custom made to fit perfectly over our beds. Last year we had slug issues, so we’re prepping better for that this time.

2
ThrowawayRV 2 points ago +2 / -0

I live in an apartment which barely gets any sunlight at all and I'd love to grow some potted flowers. Do you kings know how I could grow them, and which ones I should choose? Keep in mind that the only light they'll receive is from light bulbs.

2
rubberbiscuit 2 points ago +2 / -0

This was my first year where I tried to grow from seeds. Tomatoes did great, 3 plants in the ground, about 12 in my little pots.

Cucumbers looking great, about to put them in the garden

Tried Roma beans and sugar peas but they haven't popped up yet (maybe they will).

I also have several blueberry bushes that have been easy (but depends on no droughts and nets to keep out the fucking birds).

Then the last thing last year about this time I planted strawberries underneath my blueberry bushes, because I wanted them to spread like groundcover to keep out weeds. I had never had success with strawberries, though the south facing and soil work I did in advance must have been the key because they flourished and spread through the whole plot. Nice! No weeds! But, fucking slugs are tearing them up. I spent 3 whole days removing dead leaves and stuff and picking up slugs and squashing them like a soy boy in my fingers and today things are looking better.

1
DaLaohu 1 point ago +1 / -0

More yardening than gardening but does anyone know a good way to get rid of bushes?

1
Mark4-39 1 point ago +1 / -0

Pick axe. Shovel. Manly work.

1
DaLaohu 1 point ago +1 / -0

My thoughts exactly. I'm no stranger to such work and tools.

-2
______historymonth -2 points ago +1 / -3

Buncha bitch ass larpers

-8
squiddface -8 points ago +1 / -9

Gardening is for women.

7
Blursed2021 7 points ago +7 / -0

Sure it is big guy

-3
squiddface -3 points ago +2 / -5

I didn't know little old ladies knew how to use the internet, can you darn my socks later?

5
Blursed2021 5 points ago +5 / -0

I'd like to see you attach a disc harrow to my tractor. Hell, I'd like to see you identify what a disc harrow is without looking it up.

1
squiddface 1 point ago +1 / -0

If you have a tractor then you're farming, not gardening. Farming is for men.

1
Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

What if I have a gas powered tiller? How about if I hire someone to use their tractor in my garden?

1
squiddface 1 point ago +1 / -0

Ha I knew you weren't a farmer! Nice try, Augustine.

1
Blursed2021 1 point ago +1 / -0

I never claimed to be a farmer and only started to ask about distinctions when you made the distinction.

I do own a tractor though. And I use it to garden.